Photo: snow in Switzerland

snow in swizterland

snow in swizterland

Snow in Switzerland

Snow in Switzerland

Snow in Switzerland

Snow in Switzerland

Snow in Switzerland

Snow in Switzerland

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Photo: father and son with maize in Pakistan

Pakistan maize crop clinic Punjab

These two were attending a plant clinic in Bahawalpur district in the Punjab province of Pakistan. The browning leaves on the maize reduces the yield, and they came to the clinic to get a diagnosis and advice on how to reduce their losses. Hopefully the clinic helped, and they are now getting healthier crops! Best of luck to them

Photo: A South Sudanese woman in a market in Northern DR Congo

South Sudanese woman in Northern Congo market

This woman, whose name I unfortunately cannot remember, lived in what is now South Sudan and left during the recent troubles in Juba. She crossed into DRC and now lives in Aru, near the Ugandan border. She is growing cassava and banana to sell at the moment and is an expert seamstress. She owns her own sowing machine and gets good income from it. She was very happy to talk to me about the problems in the area. The North East Congo-Uganda-South Sudan region used to be a lawless area where many bad things happened. It is however easier now, and she is looking forward to returning to her native Juba soon. For her and her family, I really hope this happens! good luck!

Post: My talk on Afghanistan

Hi all,

If you have 20 minutes, you can view my talk on how to build a successful partnership model in Afghanistan.

Since 2011, I have been working with various partners, including the Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock, and the Aga Khan Foundation. We work in various provinces and the nature of the country’s social problems makes it hard to build a sustainable enterprise.

Nevertheless, we are well on the way, with 10 clinics being developed and running regularly in 2 provinces! We have plans for more this year, which means a greater number of farmers will have access to crop pest and disease information! Plantwise is in full swing!

The talks gives you a bit of background on Afghanistan, finding the right partners, training the staff, running clinics, and supporting the trained plant doctors with tools! As a bonus, you also get to see how cringe worthy I appear whilst talking to a (worldwide) audience!

This is the link to my video. Hope you like it! The password for watching the video is CABIJULIEN if watching directly from the vimeo website

If you are interested in learning more about CABI and Plantwise, have a look at the website:

http://www.plantwise.org

Photo: Kid in Congo trying to understand what I am doing in his village

This picture was taken when I was working in a little village called Azumba, 18 hours by motorbike into Ituri province, North Eastern DRC. This was an extremely secluded location and whilst the accommodation for the training course and subsequent plant clinic development was extremely basic, the villagers were lovely people and took great care to make sure I had a great lasting impression. I still do, and look forward to seeing them in March this year!

This picture was taken when I was working in a little village called Azumba, 18 hours by motorbike into Ituri province, North Eastern DRC. This was an extremely secluded location and whilst the accommodation for the training course and subsequent plant clinic development was extremely basic, the villagers were lovely people and took great care to make sure I had a great lasting impression. I still do, and look forward to seeing them in March this year!

Photo: Plant Health rallies in DR Congo

At CABI, we have an initiative called plant health rallies, where we interview farmers on a particular disease in the area. This can be banana bacterial wilt, cocoa black pod, Cassava mosaic virus... The big problems are the ones that not only affect farmer's crops constantly, but also their wallets. Plant health rallies are an organised extension initiative that aims at collecting information on the extent of the disease, as well as giving the farmers interviewed valuable information on  disease control and management. It is a hard day's work, as I would normally interview 200 farmers in 4 or 5 villages, and pass on information, as well as giving speeches to draw the crowd in! It is all worthwhile though, as the information we give them will hopefully aid their crop obtain better yields!

At CABI, we have an initiative called plant health rallies. this involves riding out to rural areas and interviewing farmers on a particular disease in the area, and giving them practical, economic and safe solutions for fighting the disease. This can be banana bacterial wilt, cocoa black pod disease, Cassava mosaic virus… These ┬áproblems affect their crops, but also their wallets. Plant Health Rallies are an organised extension initiative that aims at collecting information on the extent of the disease for future development of control techniques, as well as giving the farmers interviewed valuable information on disease control and management. It is a hard day’s work, as I would normally interview 200 farmers in 4 or 5 villages, and explain how to control the problem, as well as giving speeches on a chair in a random market to draw the crowd in! It is all worthwhile though, as the information we give them will hopefully aid their crop obtain better yields! I do get some people who look at me strangely. Photo: Dr Eric Boa

Photo: You Lookin’ at me BOY? zoom in to see his face!

In Grenada, in the Caribbean, we went out for a day to look at various plant diseases, including the dreaded papaya bacterial wilt, and I found this little dude keeping absolutely still. It was actually quite easy to get a close up of him. He did have quite an aggressive demeanour though...

In Grenada, in the Caribbean, we went out for a day to look at various plant diseases, including the dreaded papaya bacterial wilt, and I found this little dude keeping absolutely still. It was actually quite easy to get a close up of him. He did have quite an aggressive demeanour though… Zoom in to look at his face!