Post: My talk on Afghanistan

Hi all,

If you have 20 minutes, you can view my talk on how to build a successful partnership model in Afghanistan.

Since 2011, I have been working with various partners, including the Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock, and the Aga Khan Foundation. We work in various provinces and the nature of the country’s social problems makes it hard to build a sustainable enterprise.

Nevertheless, we are well on the way, with 10 clinics being developed and running regularly in 2 provinces! We have plans for more this year, which means a greater number of farmers will have access to crop pest and disease information! Plantwise is in full swing!

The talks gives you a bit of background on Afghanistan, finding the right partners, training the staff, running clinics, and supporting the trained plant doctors with tools! As a bonus, you also get to see how cringe worthy I appear whilst talking to a (worldwide) audience!

This is the link to my video. Hope you like it! The password for watching the video is CABIJULIEN if watching directly from the vimeo website

If you are interested in learning more about CABI and Plantwise, have a look at the website:

http://www.plantwise.org

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Post: My new article in “World Agriculture” journal

http://www.world-agriculture.net/article/57/Uganda-Agrochemical-dealers-practises-and-interactions-with-farmers

My article, recently published on “World Agriculture” discusses how agrochemical dealers, the equivalent to pharmacists in the agricultural world, cope with the necessity to run a profitable business in Uganda, whilst being able to give farmers safe efficient and practical advice.

Don’t worry, the link is just a summary. Whoever wants a full copy, let me know.

Julien

Photo: how interesting is a passion fruit flower

This flower was the only one out in the greenhouse in Kenya. The passion fruit crop had not done well that year, and farmers were beginning to get worried. As a fairly lucrative market, many farmers depend upon their passion fruit crop for their financial means during the year. In this greenhouse, the crop had not done well. We gave the farmer some advice on how to improve next year, so that each plant can be as healthy as the one with this flower!

This flower was the only one out in the greenhouse in Kenya. The passion fruit crop had not done well that year, and farmers were beginning to get worried. As a fairly lucrative market, many farmers depend upon their passion fruit crop for their financial means during the year. In this greenhouse, the crop had not done well. We gave the farmer some advice on how to improve next year, so that each plant can be as healthy as the one with this flower!

Photo: a bit of art in the fruit market of Kabul

These two guys were listening in to my interview of a farmer in Kabul fruit market. I was asking the farmer whether the information on the disease factsheet was accurate in relation to his crop. He was just talking about the improvements we can make to the factsheet when these two came round and started giving thier opinions. The more the better, and the factsheet for coddling moth on apple is now finished, and has been distributed to all major Afghan government department in rural areas. Thanks for the input guys!

These two guys were listening in to my interview of a farmer in Kabul fruit market. I was asking the farmer whether the information on the disease factsheet was accurate in relation to his crop. He was just talking about the improvements we can make to the factsheet when these two came round and started giving thier opinions. The more the better, and the factsheet for coddling moth on apple is now finished, and has been distributed to all major Afghan government department in rural areas. Thanks for the input guys!

Photo: when you concentrate, nothing else matters

Mohammad Dawool is an agricultural government worker in the Bamyan Province of Afghanistan, 1 hour west of Kabul. In this picture he is particularly concentrated because he is finishing the final test of our plant doctor training courses. He passed with flying colours, and is now running and assisting other plant clinics in the Province. I hope to see him out there this year!

Mohammad Dawool is an agricultural government worker in the Bamyan Province of Afghanistan, 1 hour west of Kabul. In this picture he is particularly concentrated because he is finishing the final test of our plant doctor training courses. He passed with flying colours, and is now running and assisting other plant clinics in the Province. I hope to see him out there this year!

Photo: Kabul and its many wonders

In Kabul, the fruit market is usually teeming in the morning. There is hardly any place to move. However, as the afternoon wears on, the place relaxes and you can actually start talking to locals. I was taking pictures of fruit diseases (yes that’s how cool I am) and a couple of local kids came up to me and started posing. I was playing around a bit, but then they wanted to see the pictures I had taken. They were not satisfied with them, so they made me concentrate! It took at least ten minutes to set this one up properly. The result is great though… Just looking at the eyes shows me a different world…

Photo: Examining cocoa beans is always a pleasure

Whenever I am working in Democratic Republic of Congo, I always link up with this caco producer and exporter. They are extremely focused on helping the farmers achieve good quality organic cocoa, as this will get them a better price. They havemany depots around North Kivu Province, and I am always happy to visit there stores and check on the quality, and watch for any impending diseases, particularly during the rainy season, when fungus can affect drying beans

Whenever I am working in Democratic Republic of Congo, I always link up with this cacao producer and exporter. They are extremely focused on helping the farmers achieve good quality organic cocoa, as this will get them a better price. They have many depots around North Kivu Province, and I am always happy to visit there stores and check on the quality, and watch for any impending diseases, particularly during the rainy season, when fungus can affect drying beans. In this picture, I am in a depot with the local area agronomist, Francois.