Photos: Western DR Congo

Kid in Mbanza Ngungu, Western DRC

Kid in Mbanza Ngungu, Western DRC

An agricultural officer at a pest and disease training

An agricultural officer at a pest and disease training

A young woman observing our activities in the field

A young woman observing our activities in the field

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Photo: my host family in Province Orientale, Northern DRC

My adoptive family in Northern DRC during a training

When I went to Province Orientale in Northern DRC, near the Sudanese border, I stayed in a very remote village that took about 12 hours to get to on a small motorbike. I was a bit apprehensive because I was not sure what I was going to find there once we arrived. My hut was clean and well looked after, and one of the families in the village looked after me. They gave me food and washed my clothes. There were adorable and I hope this picture does them justice. I think about them every now and again, and hope they are doing well. Hopefully I will see them soon! That area of DRC has a lot of problems with Cassava Mosaic virus and Banana bacterial wilt. however they have an amazing quantity of food due to the tropical conditions in the region. It rains 10 months of the year and avocado the size of watermelons grow everywhere, they feed peanuts (usually a cash crop) to the pigs and the chickens are very tasty (which I find unusual in East Africa)

Photo: a farmer in a bazaar in Kabul province, Afghanistan

Afghani Farmer in a bazaar in Qarabagh

This man was interested in the type of work we were doing in the bazaar in Qarabagh. We were helping farmers identify diseases on their crops. He just pointed and smiled. No words were needed. I think he appreciated what we were doing… I hope so anyway!

Photo: Kid in Congo trying to understand what I am doing in his village

This picture was taken when I was working in a little village called Azumba, 18 hours by motorbike into Ituri province, North Eastern DRC. This was an extremely secluded location and whilst the accommodation for the training course and subsequent plant clinic development was extremely basic, the villagers were lovely people and took great care to make sure I had a great lasting impression. I still do, and look forward to seeing them in March this year!

This picture was taken when I was working in a little village called Azumba, 18 hours by motorbike into Ituri province, North Eastern DRC. This was an extremely secluded location and whilst the accommodation for the training course and subsequent plant clinic development was extremely basic, the villagers were lovely people and took great care to make sure I had a great lasting impression. I still do, and look forward to seeing them in March this year!

Post: the art of Queuing around the world

Queuing is one of the essentials in life

Yup, that democratic but infinitely boring (and stressful) concept that is one of the stalwarts of civilisation, and one that we do perhaps 5 times a day in an urban environment. We submit to the process of queuing almost subconsciously. It is engrained in our psyche. Personally, if I skip the line, I know I am doing something a bit wrong (the strength of the emotion depending on how much of an arsehole I feel at the time).

However, this is just in the UK, my country of origin. I know how it works here, when it is acceptable to cut the line, and when I cannot. When you travel to a new country for the first time, there are different rules, and you had better learn them, quickly.

Here is a list of various scenarios, and what to do in case you get it wrong Continue reading

Post: My new article in “World Agriculture” journal

http://www.world-agriculture.net/article/57/Uganda-Agrochemical-dealers-practises-and-interactions-with-farmers

My article, recently published on “World Agriculture” discusses how agrochemical dealers, the equivalent to pharmacists in the agricultural world, cope with the necessity to run a profitable business in Uganda, whilst being able to give farmers safe efficient and practical advice.

Don’t worry, the link is just a summary. Whoever wants a full copy, let me know.

Julien